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Importing and exporting plants if there’s a no deal Brexit

This notice sets out how businesses and individuals that trade in plants and plant products would feel the affect if the UK leaves the EU in March 2019 with a no deal Brexit. ‘Plant’ means a living plant or a living part of a plant, at any stage of growth. ‘Plant product’ means products of plant origin, unprocessed or having undergone simple preparation. In so far as these are not plants, including wood and bark.
 
This includes trade that is currently managed by the EU plant passport regime or subject to third country controls under EU rules. It also includes movement of wood packaging material between the UK and the EU.
 

Before 29 March 2019

 
Currently there are no border controls on most imports and exports of plants and plant products between the UK and the EU. Some plants and plant products that present a higher biosecurity risk are managed under the EU plant passport regime.
 
For trade with third countries, the process is different. Some plants and plant products that do not pose a biosecurity risk can move freely. Others, known as ‘controlled’ plants and plant products, must meet certain import requirements because they pose a risk to plant health. The importing country determines which plants and plant products are under control.
 
The list of plants and plant products managed under the EU plant passport regime for trade between EU countries is not the same as the list of commodities from outside the EU – third country goods – that are controlled by the EU.
 
Controlled third country goods include all plants (including some seeds) and certain plant products. These goods are specified in the EU Plant Health Directive and associated legislation, implemented in the UK through national legislation.
 
Controlled goods exported from the UK to third countries are determined by the country receiving the goods. They must travel with a Phytosanitary Certificate (PC) issued by the relevant plant health authority. These are usually checked on arrival at the border of the third country concerned. The relevant plant health authority is the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) in England and in Wales on behalf of the Welsh Government, the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in Northern Ireland, and the Scottish Government’s Plant Health Service in Scotland. For forestry material, the relevant authority is the Forestry Commission (FC) or DAERA in Northern Ireland.
 
The relevant UK plant health authorities are responsible for enforcing import controls. They are also in charge of issuing Phytosanitary Certificates for export from the UK.
 

Wood Packaging Material

 
Wood packaging material (WPM) includes pallets, crates, boxes, cable drums, spools and dunnage.
 
WPM imported from and exported to third countries is subject to International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure No. 15 (ISPM15). This is an international standard under the International Plant Protection Convention that countries must apply to reduce the risk of the introduction and spread of certain pests. ISPM15 requires WPM to receive treatment (typically using heat treatment) and marked. Risk-based checks run on WPM moving from third countries into the UK to ensure ISPM15standards are being met.
 
Currently, WPM moving between the UK and the rest of the EU does not need to meet ISPM15 requirements and can move freelyWPM moving in and out of Portugal and parts of Spain must conform to ISPM15 standards, owing to the presence of Pinewood nematode.
 

After March 2019 if there’s a no deal Brexit

 
In the unlikely event that the UK leaves the EU in March 2019 with a no deal Brexit, the UK would be treated as a third country and would lose access to the EU plant passport regime. This would affect businesses that export to the EU, import from the EU, and move some plants and plant products within the UK. Exports to and imports from current third countries would not be directly affected.
 

Exports from the UK to EU countries

 
In a ‘no deal’ scenario, the UK would become a third country, and would need to meet EU third country import requirements to export controlled plants and plant products to the EU, including controls on all plants for planting and all wood packaging material.
 
The process for sending controlled plants and plant products to the EU would be the same as the current process for sending them to third countries. Under this process, businesses need to apply for a Phytosanitary Certificate (PC) from the relevant UK plant health authority before they can export. Some commodities require laboratory testing of samples to ensure they are free from pests and diseases, while others also need to have had an inspection during the growing season.
 
These services are subject to fees and charges. More information about fees and charges is available on GOV.UK.
 
Consignments of controlled plants and plant products exported to the EU from the UK may be subject to checks at the EU border.
 

Imports from EU countries to the UK

 
To deliver a smooth transition when we leave the EU, in a no deal Brexit scenario the Government has decided that the majority of plants and plant products are low-risk and should continue to enter the UK from the EU freely, as they do now.
 

Exceptions

 
Plants and plant products managed under the EU plant passport regime: Plants and plant products currently managed under the EU plant passport regime would be subject to UK import controls to replace the assurance and traceability offered by the EU plant passport regime, maintaining biosecurity whilst minimising the impact on businesses.
 
Consignments of these plants and plant products entering the UK would require a PCissued in the country of export (or re-export), and the importer or the importer’s agent would need to inform the relevant plant health authority in the UK before the consignment arrived. Further details of how to inform the relevant plant health authority are available on GOV.UK. The importer or agent would also need to provide scanned copies of the PC and relevant documents in advance to the relevant UK plant health authority, and supply the original copy of the PC once the consignment has arrived.
 
Consignments of plants and plant products from EU countries would not be stopped at the border. The relevant UK plant health authority would carry out documentary and identity checks remotely. These checks would be charged for by the plant health authority.
 
As currently, plant health inspectors would continue to carry out follow-up inspections inland on a risk-targeted basis. The government does not charge for such inspections.
 
Plants and plant products originating outside the EU and arriving in the UK via the EU: Plants and plant products that come from non-EU countries, but travel to the UK via the EU without an EU member state carrying out plant health checks, would be treated as non-EU imports and subject to third country controls on arrival in the UK. Further details on current third country controls are available on GOV.UK. Detail on alternative arrangements for points of entry that do not have capacity to carry out third country controls at the border will be made available in due course.
 

Plants and plant products moving within the UK

 
In the unlikely event of a no deal Brexit scenario, there would be a new UK plant passport regime. Plants and plant products currently covered by the EU plant passport regime when moved within the UK would be managed by the new UK regime. Businesses wishing to move these plants and plant products within the UK would need to be authorised by the relevant UK plant health authority to issue UK plant passports. They would need to issue plant passports when moving those plants and plant products within the UK.
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