July 23, 2017

Latest:

Trellis/Scottish Prison Service gardening exhibition 2017 -

Sunday, July 23, 2017

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Saturday, July 22, 2017

Dependable power that works as hard as you do -

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Warnes McGarr & Co’s RHS Tatton Park garden wins gold -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Touchwood Play help create £3m bespoke indoor timber play experience -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Green-tech’s latest product addition Katoun® Gold -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Hartley Botanic showcases classic plantings at Tatton Park -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Improvement programme well underway at Sheffield’s largest park -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Wicksteed Park receives HLF support -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Xylella fastidiosa a threat to the UK horticulture industry -

Friday, July 21, 2017

St Marylebone success for Robert Myers Association -

Friday, July 21, 2017

re-form Landscape Architecture expands Manchester office -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Declaration signed to promote conservation of ancient trees -

Friday, July 21, 2017

Stewart Plant Sales appointed Baroness dealer for Central and Southern Scotland -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

APL and HTA members have reason to celebrate at RHS Flower Show Tatton Park -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

John Craven and Charlie Dimmock to open 2017 Southport Flower Show -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

City Council’s Cabinet decision moves Newcastle’s Parks Charitable Trust a step closer -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Horticap’s students gain industry insight from nursery visit -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Communities encouraged to go DIY in making their neighbourhoods more sustainable -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Global Stone grows its team -

Thursday, July 20, 2017

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2017 Q&A – Artisan – The World Horse Welfare Garden

Inspired by the work of The World Horse Welfare Charity, the garden uses plants to tell the story of a horse that has been rescued from a derelict stable featuring plants that are dangerous and harmful to horses and re-homed into an open meadow with horse-friendly plants. The sponsor for this garden is World Horse Welfare and plants are supplied by Majestic Trees, Practicality Brown and British Wildflower Plants.

Q&A with the garden designers, Adam Woolcott & Jonathan Smith:

When did you first start working on the original design and how long did it take to perfect?

Sometimes we have months to develop a design but on this occasion we were approached at the last minute and only had a couple of weeks to develop a concept and get something down on paper. But after a few long days and nights we managed to work through a design with which we were really happy.

What are the stand out features of this particular garden?

It’s a traditional wildflower garden that tells the story of a rescued horse from a derelict, abandoned stable to a more liberating and safe environment.

Because of the story it tells, I suppose the stable itself will be the stand out feature. It will look quite menacing and neglected and will be constructed from reclaimed bricks and slate roofing tiles. We will further age and distress the brick work to add to its character. The horse show sculpture is also pretty special, constructed out of horseshoes from celebrity horses and from horses belonging to supporters of the charity.

Did the sponsor provide a detailed brief? If so, how did you interpret this within your design?

We were given a reasonably detailed brief in that the charity wanted a traditional, wild, natural garden that would highlight its work in this, its 90th year. We are known for our nostalgic, soulful gardens that convey an emotional message and this was a good fit with the message World Horse Welfare wanted to get across to its supporters. Initially we came up with two concepts for the garden but very quickly decided on this one, with the charity’s approval.

What is so special about having a show garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show?

Chelsea is the most prestigious gardening show on the planet and to be one garden out of nine in our category is awesome. We have met some great people at Chelsea over the years, both visitors and exhibitors, and we really enjoy the challenge.

How do you hope the public/visitors will perceive this garden?

We want people to be drawn into the garden, stay awhile, and reflect on the beauty of British native wildflowers but more importantly to feel an emotional reaction to the dreadful conditions that some horses are found in and the opportunity they have in helping World Horse Welfare save many more horses, like the one depicted in our garden.

 

Q&A with the contractor, Conway Landscapes:

What are you most looking forward to about the build?

We have done quite a few gardens in Ranelagh and a lot of them with Woolcott and Smith, so we’re looking forward to getting the team together at Chelsea again. Camaraderie doing these little gardens is great and we are next door to Ishihara this year again.

What’s going to be the biggest challenge on the build?

We have to build a stable and make it look very old and run down. Believe it or not quite a hard thing to do but we have done a few old ones now so have little tricks to age it all.

Are specialist contractors required for any elements?

For the stream at the front of the property, we will be getting our aquatic specialist in to finish it, ensuring the flow rate is correct etc.

If you could take one thing away with you from this garden, what would it be?

We didn’t realize to be honest that horse welfare was such a huge issue. When we do a garden we always research the reasoning behind it and this gives us the motivation to do the best we possibly can for the cause. World Horse welfare considers a vast amount of problems from unlawful grazing to neglect and even abandonment! Having a daughter who rides and loves horses the charity has already got some keen supporters.

Do you think the judges have enough knowledge of the complexity of construction when deciding on the medals?

Yes, particularly down Ranelagh Gardens. We are not allowed to excavate so we are up against it from the off. It’s all in plain site with this garden with ageing of the stable, walls and the stream. Except for the stable door, nothing is made off site. The amount of hard landscaping done in a maximum of five days will be obvious to see.

 

Emma Williams, director of fundraising for World Horse Welfare, said: “Exhibiting at RHS Chelsea provides an invaluable opportunity to engage with both new and existing supporters, as well as showcasing our work, to a new audience in a way which is completely unique to anything we have ever done before.

“We hope the garden will be thought-provoking and emotive. We want to encourage people to reflect on the plight of neglected and abused horses and be inspired to join us in taking action to help them. Without the support of the public, we would simply not be able to continue our work and so the garden will pay tribute to all the people who support us in many different ways from those who add their voices to our campaigning actions to those who rehome our horses, take part in fundraising events or choose to leave a gift in their will.”

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