My Twitter Feed

January 17, 2018

Latest:

Gristwood and Toms champions international accreditation programme -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Green-tree launches bespoke soil for Rain Gardens -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Make your voice heard – Pro Landscaper digital survey -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Landscaping companies announced for APL Avenue at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2018 -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Butter Wakefield to design Gaze Burvill garden at RHS Chelsea 2018 -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

North Yorkshire nursery helps restore historic site to former glories -

Monday, January 15, 2018

RHS begins search for School Gardeners of the Year -

Monday, January 15, 2018

Thrive seeking more people as volunteering in nature proven to be good for health -

Monday, January 15, 2018

INNSA responds to glyphosate licence renewal -

Monday, January 15, 2018

BASIS launches new Lawn Assured Standard -

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Funding agreed for Marwood Community Hall project -

Saturday, January 13, 2018

University secures planning approval for student centre and new civic space -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Först to showcase new lightweight petrol woodchipper at EHS -

Friday, January 12, 2018

A556 ‘green bridge’ is winter wonderland -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Bespoke membership scheme The Turf Club launches -

Friday, January 12, 2018

New guidelines call for homes for people and wildlife -

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Parks plan agreed by Knowsley Council’s Cabinet -

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Government publishes 25-year Environment Plan -

Thursday, January 11, 2018

LDA Design and WSP to lead Plymouth revamp -

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Glendale Horticulture acquires new 15.5-acre nursery -

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Poinsettias are ready to go the distance in 2017

Poinsettia breeders in Germany and Holland are improving plant quality and durability by looking at ways in which to strengthen these seasonal hybrid heroes to better withstand transportation. Transportation is one of the main causes of the poinsettia plant’s failure to thrive.

Poinsettia plants can be vulnerable during transportation so a select group of breeders are looking at ways to improve their durability by testing the plants in simulated transport conditions, such as reducing light levels and creating fluctuations of temperature. Plants are boxed in darkness for several days, and kept at lower temperatures. The packaging is then removed and the plant is placed on a shelf in a standard light level. The performance of the plants is rated according to their leaf-yellowing and the best plants are then shortlisted. The growers then meet in January to review results and the strongest performing new varieties are selected for the coming season.

Guido von Tubeuf, Poinsettia breeder at selecta one in Stuttgart, Germany, said: “Our Poinsettia varieties, particularly those of the ‘Christmas Feelings’ family  are repeatedly awarded for excellent quality and shelf life with the LTO Quality Award in the Netherlands. We also undertake regular in-house durability and stress tests under transport situations. Sustainable production alongside good shelf-life will lead to satisfied producers and customers.”

In order to lengthen shelf-life, breeders have produced many thousands of hybrid seedlings, bred to withstand the temperature fluctuations that poinsettias are subjected to once they are brought into the home, ensuring that the plant remains attractive and healthy through to the end of the Christmas holidays.

Colin Edwards, managing director of Woodlark Nurseries, Surrey, said: “The modern varieties that are bred in Northern European countries today are excellent and really do give the consumer a fantastic festive plant for the Christmas holidays. This ongoing breeding programme ensures the continuing strength of this beautiful plant.”

Comments are closed.