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December 14, 2017

Latest:

Lowther Castle and Gardens wins at The Georgian Group Architectural Awards -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Harworth employees dig deep for City of Trees -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Oak View Landscapes – BALI National Award for Employer Excellence -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Extension to the Oxford St district consultation period -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

The Paysalia Innovation Trophies 2017 Prize List -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Third Annual Snowdrop Festival -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Outdoor Deck Company launch brand new website -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Ground Control triumph at BALI National Landscape Awards, scooping Principal Award for Grounds Maintenance -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Hong Kong-based practice Morphis to open UK design studio -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Kubota’s enhanced machinery to offer turf proffesionals more at BTME -

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Allies and Morrison wins international design competition to restore, reimagine and rebuild Clandon Park -

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Boosting construction productivity could deliver £15 billion savings every year -

Friday, December 8, 2017

Paysalia – The “must” show for landscape, garden and sports ground professionals -

Friday, December 8, 2017

£2million National Lottery boost to innovate and improve public parks -

Friday, December 8, 2017

New resources launched for professionals in refugee and green space sectors -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Glendale community garden scoops industry award -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Perennial’s 2018 Special Events programme gets boost from Challenge Fencing -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

idverde scoops industry’s top accolade for grounds maintenance for fifth consecutive year -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

December issue – Pro Landscaper -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Shed Grounds Maintenance wins prestigious Award -

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

New resources launched for professionals in refugee and green space sectors

A new report and resources from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Landscape open the way to increased use and enjoyment of parks by refugees.

This week saw the launch in Bethnal Green, East London of a significant research project and resources, led by the University of Sheffield’s Department of Landscape and the Young Foundation, which look at ways of improving the ways refugees and asylum seekers can access and enjoy green space.

Dr Clare Rishbeth, Landscape Lecturer at University of Sheffield, explained that parks can play an important role in supporting wellbeing and connection for refugees and asylum seekers. The research project investigated how, demonstrated practical examples and case studies, and proposed courses of action that could improve access to and enjoyment of parks by displaced communities.

Speaking at the launch at the Young Foundation headquarters, Clare said: “Our project methods are founded on three principles: careful listening, learning from different contexts, and giving back so as to support change.”

During the course of the research, Clare and her colleagues conducted 16 interviews and many informal conversations with refugees and asylum seekers, and 35 interviews with a range of stakeholder groups from both the refugee sector (support and orientation services, conversation clubs and mental health services) and the green space sector (management, design, advocacy and community support). The study spanned locations in Sheffield, London and Berlin. In June, the LI invited Clare to present her initial findings at its 2017 Conference, Landscape as Infrastructure.

The project comprises research and a toolkit and resource book. For those who work directly with refugees and asylum seekers, the resource book will share information on how the use of public space can help to facilitate wellbeing and inclusion, and offers ideas for supporting positive experiences. For those involved in the planning, design or management of parks or other outdoor public spaces, the resource book gives insight into the experiences of refugee and asylum seeker park users, highlights relevant barriers and expectations, and offers ideas for engagement and inclusion approaches. And for those new in a city and eager to find out about initiatives and activities that you could join, there are ideas for opportunities that are available in parks and other open spaces.

For further details, including free downloads of the study and resources, visit refugeeswelcomeinparks.com.

Image Credit: Paul Lincoln

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