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December 13, 2017

Latest:

Lowther Castle and Gardens wins at The Georgian Group Architectural Awards -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Harworth employees dig deep for City of Trees -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Oak View Landscapes – BALI National Award for Employer Excellence -

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Extension to the Oxford St district consultation period -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

The Paysalia Innovation Trophies 2017 Prize List -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Third Annual Snowdrop Festival -

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Outdoor Deck Company launch brand new website -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Ground Control triumph at BALI National Landscape Awards, scooping Principal Award for Grounds Maintenance -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Hong Kong-based practice Morphis to open UK design studio -

Monday, December 11, 2017

Kubota’s enhanced machinery to offer turf proffesionals more at BTME -

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Allies and Morrison wins international design competition to restore, reimagine and rebuild Clandon Park -

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Boosting construction productivity could deliver £15 billion savings every year -

Friday, December 8, 2017

Paysalia – The “must” show for landscape, garden and sports ground professionals -

Friday, December 8, 2017

£2million National Lottery boost to innovate and improve public parks -

Friday, December 8, 2017

New resources launched for professionals in refugee and green space sectors -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Glendale community garden scoops industry award -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Perennial’s 2018 Special Events programme gets boost from Challenge Fencing -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

idverde scoops industry’s top accolade for grounds maintenance for fifth consecutive year -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

December issue – Pro Landscaper -

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Shed Grounds Maintenance wins prestigious Award -

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Landscape protection confirmed for Cornwall’s rare species

Rare species like the marsh fritillary butterfly and willow tit bird have been given a conservation boost today, with Natural England officially recognising the Mid Cornwall Moors as one of the country’s most important wildlife sites.

Following a four-month public consultation, Natural England has confirmed the designation of the Mid Cornwall Moors as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), giving the area legal protection for its important wildlife and habitats.

This brings certainty and purpose to conservation work in Mid Cornwall, where the rich mix of heathland, woodland, and wildflower meadows provides a vital sanctuary for wildlife.

Wesley Smyth, manager of Devon, Cornwall and Isles of Scilly team in Natural England, said: “This rich and diverse landscape of Mid Cornwall is home to an array of rare plants and insects, alongside one of the highest densities of willow tit breeding pairs in England.

“That’s why we’ve designated this area as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, recognising its vital contribution to our natural heritage and helping its precious wildlife thrive for generations to come.”

Natural England is working with landowners and local organisations, such as the Cornwall Wildlife Trust and Butterfly Conservation, to create the perfect conditions for the rare marsh fritillary butterfly. With further help from the Eden Project and Highways England, swathes of devil’s-bit scabious – the main food plant for the marsh fritillary caterpillars – have been grown and planted alongside the A30 road corridor.

Philip Hambly, chairman of Cornwall Butterfly Conservation (CBC), said: “CBC have been working with Natural England in order to help protect the rare Marsh Fritillary butterfly in Mid Cornwall, and this confirmation of SSSI protection will help future conservation efforts. If we want to protect our rare species such as this, we must manage their habitats carefully and make sure that we are doing so on a landscape scale.”

As part of the area’s newly-designated status, another project seeks to protect the habitat of the willow tit, which has virtually disappeared from large parts of the UK and whose national population has declined by an estimated 81% since the mid-1990s.

The Mid Cornwall Moors SSSI merges six former SSSIs that previously dotted the landscape around the A30 and east of Indian Queens. The new designation has extended those boundaries and protects around 50% more countryside, connecting important habitats and helping wildlife to withstand pressures from climate change.

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