November 19, 2017

Latest:

Enjoy 12 giveaways of Christmas with Hillier -

Saturday, November 18, 2017

A lost legacy: Manchester’s Royal Botanical Garden -

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Landscape Partnership seeks consultant to collate historic evidence -

Friday, November 17, 2017

8,000 new trees to be planted this year in Sheffield -

Friday, November 17, 2017

Stewart Milne Homes appoints new construction director to drive growth in Central Scotland -

Friday, November 17, 2017

Northern Design Awards – Barnes Walker reaches prestigious finals -

Friday, November 17, 2017

BALI National Landscape Awards 2017 is a sell-out event -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Lee Bestall finalist in this year’s Northern Design Awards -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Pro Landscaper’s Most Influential revealed -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Funding boost for Bilston Urban Village ‘Garden City’ site -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Landscape protection confirmed for Cornwall’s rare species -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Minister for London welcomes £1.4 billion Croydon redevelopment -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Green-tech launches new anchoring system at Futurescape 2017 -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Makita’s new factory service centre & training academy in Glasgow has a national role -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Lister Wilder Ltd announced as this year’s biggest UK ‘MOW-team’ -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Oman Botanic Garden revealed -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Capel Manor College wins key horticulture apprenticeship contract -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Time running out to effectively transpose EU Environmental Acquis into UK Law -

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Save up to £2775 and 50% of the cost of a battery with Pellenc -

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Civic Engineers awarded £1.8 million contract to help deliver Glasgow City Centre ‘Avenues’ project -

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

idverde supports Colchester Council’s tree giveaway scheme

idverde supported its client Colchester Borough Council’s Trees for Years scheme, which was held on Saturday 4 February. This popular annual scheme now in its eleventh year sees over 2,000 tree and fruit bushes given away free to local residents, community and volunteer groups, schools, and town or parish councils. The scheme aims to help to promote and create a green and healthy environment for Colchester residents to live and work.

idverde, which works in partnership with the Council to maintain the Borough’s green spaces, provided sponsorship of £2,000 to help purchase the trees, and also provided support on the day.

Despite the event officially starting at 10am, eager Colchester residents began arriving to choose their trees and plants from 8am. Species available included:

  • Field maple
  • Silver birch
  • Red stem dogwood
  • Yellow stem dogwood
  • Hazel
  • Lavender
  • Bird cherry
  • Blackcurrant
  • Gooseberries
  • Raspberries

Plants were limited to three per household, and 15 per community group, and a planting guide was given to residents, giving advice on caring for their new plants.

Around 700 people attended the event, and by midday all 2,400 of the plants had been collected.

idverde contract manager, Andrew Fulcher, said: “idverde was extremely pleased to be able to support this year’s Trees for Years event. Not only is this a great scheme to help residents and community groups to green up their gardens for free, but the day was a great opportunity for our team to meet and get to know Colchester’s local residents. A very successful morning.”

Cllr Annie Feltham, portfolio holder for business, leisure and opportunities also commented: “We are extremely grateful to idverde for supporting the fantastic Trees for Years initiative and helping to make it such a success. It is a great scheme, which continues to help Colchester residents and local groups to make their communities a greener and more pleasant place to be.”

Comments
One Response to “idverde supports Colchester Council’s tree giveaway scheme”
  1. Tony Leach says:

    Great initiative but so sad to see bare roots exposed in your photo. How many will survive after such poor treatment?