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January 17, 2018

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Two weeks left to share views on plans for Bristol’s parks -

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Carillion’s liquidation and its effect on the landscaping industry -

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Perennial offers support following Carillion collapse -

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Brighton & Hove City Council produces plan to protect Stanmer Park’s woods -

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Liverpool sets out 15-year plan for growth -

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Gristwood and Toms champions international accreditation programme -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Green-tree launches bespoke soil for Rain Gardens -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Make your voice heard – Pro Landscaper digital survey -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Landscaping companies announced for APL Avenue at BBC Gardeners’ World Live 2018 -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Butter Wakefield to design Gaze Burvill garden at RHS Chelsea 2018 -

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

North Yorkshire nursery helps restore historic site to former glories -

Monday, January 15, 2018

RHS begins search for School Gardeners of the Year -

Monday, January 15, 2018

Thrive seeking more people as volunteering in nature proven to be good for health -

Monday, January 15, 2018

INNSA responds to glyphosate licence renewal -

Monday, January 15, 2018

BASIS launches new Lawn Assured Standard -

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Funding agreed for Marwood Community Hall project -

Saturday, January 13, 2018

University secures planning approval for student centre and new civic space -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Först to showcase new lightweight petrol woodchipper at EHS -

Friday, January 12, 2018

A556 ‘green bridge’ is winter wonderland -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Bespoke membership scheme The Turf Club launches -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Designs for Manchester’s proposed new Peace Garden created by landscape architecture students

Landscape architecture students have created ideas to help shape the design of Manchester’s proposed replacement Peace Garden.

For the Integrated Project 2017 – part of the Master of Landscape Architecture course at the Manchester School of Architecture at Manchester Metropolitan University – they focused on the live issue of creating a new Peace Garden in Manchester city centre.

Since the removal of the previous Peace Garden five years ago as part of the redevelopment of St Peter’s Square, The Friends of Manchester Peace Garden have been campaigning to get the garden re-instated.

Lincoln Square has been identified by Manchester City Council as the likely location for the new garden and Planit-IE was recently appointed by a consortium of developers to deliver the public realm of the area.

Working in close collaboration with the Friends group as well as Planit-IE, some 36 students worked in groups over a very intensive week from September 22 to 29 to explore how the many and complex ideas behind the apparently simple word ‘peace’ might be translated into the form of a contemporary public space in a rapidly changing city.

The groups presented their proposals to a panel of judges, including Qaisra Shahraz of Faith Network for Manchester, sculptor Karen Lyons (creator of the Erinma Bell bust in Manchester Town Hall) and Steve Roman and Rae Street of The Friends of Manchester Peace Garden.

Group A was announced as the winner (see image) with their design titled ‘Equilibrium Contemplation Protection’, while Group E was the Runner Up – ‘Experiential Overlaps’ was their title.

The winning proposal was based on the idea of ‘peace’ as an inner state of mind characterised by equilibrium, contemplation and protection.

This group designed an oval reflecting pool semi-enclosed by a wall punctuated with ‘windows’ and enlivened by a continually flowing waterfall: a simple, powerful and very professionally presented vision of a new icon for the city centre and a space for contemplation.

The runners-up, in contrast, proposed the idea of peace as diversity and interaction, manifesting this through a more complex, diverse space composed of multiple overlapping circles, defined through differences in material, texture, vegetation, height and function. The judges praised this entry for its dynamic and diverse vision of ‘peace’ and for the varied sensory experience created, allowing for gatherings, meetings, quiet reflection, celebration and play.

On behalf of all the judges, Steve Roman said: “We were very impressed by the quality of the student designs and by the depth and range of their thinking on the concept of peace.

“We were also amazed by how much work they achieved in just seven days.

“We are grateful to them all. The Friends look forward to using the stimulus of the designs in the next stage of encouraging the re-installation of a Peace Garden for Manchester.”

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