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May 27, 2018

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Success for Woodlodge at RHS Chelsea Flower Show -

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Business rates success for growers -

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Covent Garden blooms for Chelsea Fringe -

Saturday, May 26, 2018

American Hardwood Export Council and Waugh Thistleton Architects collaborate with ARUP on landmark pavilion -

Friday, May 25, 2018

Summer celebration of art, creativity and imagination at Borde Hill Garden -

Friday, May 25, 2018

Special RHS Chelsea award winners revealed -

Friday, May 25, 2018

Stihl expands Viking range of petrol mowers -

Friday, May 25, 2018

Celebrating the benefits of plants with The Great Escape industry exhibit -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Plant of the Year and Product of the Year revealed at RHS Chelsea -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

HTA makes two big appointments -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Timotay Landscapes shortlisted for APL Avenue Show Garden competition -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Love Your Garden: NHS Special -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Alan Titchmarsh presents Griffin Glasshouses’ donation to the National Garden Scheme -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Capel Manor’s ’50 Shades of Gold’ garden wins Gold at RHS Chelsea Flower Show -

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Bernhard’s Nurseries enjoy success at Chelsea Flower Show -

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Countrywide Grounds landscapes new garden to provide respite for patients at Alderney Hospital -

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

The Myeloma UK Garden by John Everiss wins Silver-Gilt at RHS Chelsea 2018 -

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

The Lemon Tree Trust Refugee Garden wins Silver-Gilt at Chelsea -

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Hat trick of awards for Landform Consultants at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 -

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

10 design trends at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show from SGD members -

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Millboard

Confor reacts to government consultation on future rural policy and funding

Confor has welcomed a consultation described by UK Environment Secretary Michael Gove as a “historic opportunity” to shape future rural policy and funding, while calling for more detail on the future role of forestry in the countryside.

Government proposals would see money shift from direct payments under the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP), which are based on the amount of land farmed, to a new system of paying farmers “public money for public goods” – such as enhancing the environment and investing in sustainable food production.

Other public goods which could be supported include investment in technology and skills to improve productivity, providing public access, enhanced welfare standards and measures to support the resilience of rural communities.

Stuart Goodall, Chief Executive of Confor, said: “Confor welcomes Michael Gove’s vision for a move away from direct payments to farmers to a new environmental land management system – as long as this provides a level playing field for forest management. This approach should support new tree planting, although it is unclear whether existing woodland will benefit.”

There is a 10-week consultation period (which ends on 8 May) and Mr Goodall urged the forestry and wood processing industry to take part.

“This is potentially a once-in-a-generation consultation and it is important that businesses in the sector make their views known. Confor will share its views in the coming weeks – but a central plank of our thinking, as outlined in our Common Countryside Policy, is that all rural interests must be treated fairly. We need a blueprint which supports the whole countryside, including forestry.”

The government will continue to commit the same cash total in funds for support until the end of this Parliament in 2022.

Its paper – Health and Harmony: The Future for Food, Farming and the Environment in a Green Brexit’ – sets out proposals for an ‘agricultural transition’ lasting an unspecified number of years beyond the implementation period during which direct payments would continue. This will provide “stability and certainty for farmers as they prepare for the new system”, the Government says.

It claims that reductions to direct payments (to the largest landowners first) could free up around £150 million in the first year of the agricultural transition period, which could be used to boost farmers delivering environmental enhancement and other public goods.

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